Swanswell Medical Centre Tel: 0121 706 5676

All GP practices are required to declare the mean earnings (e.g. average pay) for GPs working to deliver NHS services to patients at each practice.

The average pay for GPs who worked for six months or more in Swanswell Medical Centre in the last financial year was £79496 before Tax and National Insurance.  This is for 3 part time GPs.

You do not require a doctor's sickness certificate for any illness lasting seven days or less. Your employer may require you to complete a Self-Certification Form (SC2).

However, this will also depend on your employer's sickness absence policy. The policy should tell you how many days you are allowed to be off sick before proof of illness or a Fit Note stating that you were unable to work is required.

Evidence that you are sick

If you are sick for more than seven days, your employer can ask you to give them some form of medical evidence to support payment of Statutory Sick Pay (SSP). This will usually be a Fit Note stating that you were too ill to work at all.

If appropriate to the reason for your absence, you could also provide evidence from someone who is not a medical practitioner, e.g. a dentist. Your employer will decide whether or not this evidence is acceptable. If your employer has any doubts, they may still ask for a medical certificate from your GP.

If your employer refuses to accept an SC2 for a period of sickness absence lasting seven days or less, we are able to provide you with a Private Sickness Certificate for a charge of £63, to be paid to reception at the time of collecting the note. The cost of this note may be redeemable from your employer.

It is not practice policy to issue medical certificates or letters to patients who request these after they have missed an important legal commitment, such as a court date or a probation attendance. Requests for medical evidence to support failure to attend must be made before the date of attendance and as soon as the patient could reasonably anticipate missing the date of the legal commitment. Medical evidence will only be provided when the patient directly consults with the doctor, unless they have attended hospital. In some cases a discussion may need to take place between the doctor and the patient's lawyer or probation officer, before a decision to provide medical evidence can be made.

Statement of Fitness for Work - ’Fit Note'

The Fit Note, introduced on 6 April 2010, not only allows your doctor to state that you are unable to work at all, but can also state that although you are not fully recovered, you are able to return to work on an agreed date provided your employer makes some changes to your working hours and/or to your working practices. The duration of these changes and what they should be can be specified in the note and can incorporate discussions you have already had with your employer as to how they will facilitate your gradual return to work. It is not Practice policy to issue a 'Fit to return to work' certificate.

Please read this guide for more information about what the different sections on your Fit Note mean, and how you can use it to talk with your employer about returning to work - The Fit Note.

For more information see the DirectGov website (where this information was sourced)

Sick Notes following Hospital Treatment

If you have been treated in a hospital, it is the responsibility of your consultant to issue a Sick Note that will cover you for the entirety of the period during which it is anticipated you will not be able to return to work. Please do not book a doctor's appointment to request a sick note following hospital treatment, as this will be refused.

These fact sheets have been written to explain the role of UK health services, the National Health Service (NHS), to newly-arrived individuals seeking asylum. They cover issues such as the role of GPs, their function as gatekeepers to the health services, how to register and how to access emergency services.

Special care has been taken to ensure that information is given in clear language, and the content and style has been tested with user groups. Open the leaflets in one of the following languages

 

england English Urdu Urdu
albania Albanian india Hindi
egypt Arabic lithuania Lithuanian
bulgaria Bulgarian poland Polish
china Chinese (Cantonese) portugal Portuguese
china Chinese (Mandarin) spain Spanish
russia Russian French French
Turkish Turkish Punjabi Punjabi
Gujerati Gujerati Somali Somali
Croatian Croatian Bengali Bengali
Iran Farsi

It’s Your Practice: A patient guide to GP services has been put together by the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) for patients.

This guide has been produced as part of the RCGP’s aim to build stronger relationships between you and your doctors and encourage the involvement and inclusion of you in your own care.

The guide provides helpful information on all aspects of using GP services: from finding and choosing a practice and how to get the most out of a GP consultation to accessing health records and understanding patients’ rights and responsibilities.

It is split into several sections including:

  • General Practice explained
  • Choosing the right practice for you
  • Registering with a GP practice
  • Seeing your GP – consultations
  • Seeing your GP – the next steps
  • After your GP consultation
  • Your health record
  • Your rights and responsibilities as a patient
  • Get involved with your practice

The publication is part of a push by the NHS as a whole to encourage you to understand how you can get the most out of primary care – which also includes how you can become more involved in monitoring your own health.

We are keen to help patients improve on self help and hope that the following information will offer some insight into that.

Take a look and see if you can improve your own understanding of your health and well-being! Please encourage others to look here too.

Here is a list of ailments that can be safely self managed. You will see that you can take a look via the hyperlink at the other websites which can offer you further information about managing your condition.

Common ailments that can be self managed :

Back pain

NHS Choices - back pain

Exercises to manage pain

Self-refer to a Physiotherapist

Children's illnesses

When Should I Worry?

Cold sores

NHS Choices - cold sores

Common Cold

NHS Choices - common colds

Conjunctivitis

NHS Choices - conjunctivitis

Constipation

NHS Choices - constipation

Cough

NHS Choices - coughs

Diabetes

Fit 4 Diabetes - patient advice leaflets

Diarrhoea

NHS Choices - diarrhoea

Dysmenorrhoea (painful periods)

NHS Choices - painful periods

Earache

NHS Choices - earache

Eye problems

Minor Eye Conditions Service

Haemorrhoids

NHS Choices - haemorrhoids

Hayfever

NHS Choices - hayfever

Head lice

NHS Choices - head lice

Headache

NHS Choices - headache

Heartburn & Indigestion

NHS Choices - heartburn & indigestion

Influenza

NHS Choices - influenza

Insect bites

NHS Choices - insect bites

Migraine

NHS Choices - migraine

Nasal congestion

NHS Choices - nasal congestion

Nappy rash

NHS Choices - nappy rash

Sore throat

NHS Choices - sore throat

Sinusitis

NHS Choices - sinusitis

Sprains & strains

NHS Choices - sprains

Stop smoking

NHS Smoke Free

Thrush

NHS Choices - thrush

Warts & Verrucas

NHS Choices - warts & verrucas

Children's Immunisation Schedule

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the age at which you should ideally have them.

2 months:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children) given as a 5-in-1 single jab known as DTaP/IPV/Hib
  • Pneumococcal infection

3 months:

  • 5-in-1, second dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Meningitis C

4 months:

  • 5-in-1, third dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Pneumococcal infection, second dose
  • Meningitis C, second dose

Between 12 and 13 months:

  • Meningitis C, third dose
  • Hib, fourth dose (Hib/MenC given as a single jab)
  • MMR (measles, mumps and rubella), given as a single jab
  • Pneumococcal infection, third dose

3 years and 4 months, or soon after:

  • MMR second jab
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (DtaP/IPV), given as a 4-in-1 pre-school booster

Around 12-13 years:

  • Cervical cancer (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer (girls only): three jabs given within six months

Around 13-18 years:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio booster (Td/IPV), given as a single jab

65 and over:

  • Flu (every year)
  • Pneumococcal

HPA Childrens Vaccination Schedule

Click here for the recommended HPA vaccination schedule

Seasonal Flu Vaccination

Influenza – flu – is a highly infectious and potentially serious illness caused by influenza viruses. Each year the make-up of the seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against the influenza viruses that the World Health Organization decide are most likely to be circulating in the coming winter.

Regular immunisation (vaccination) is given free of charge to the following at-risk people, to protect them from seasonal flu:

  • people aged 65 or over,
  • people with a serious medical condition
  • people living in a residential or nursing home
  • the main carers for an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer becomes ill
  • healthcare or social care professionals directly involved in patient care, and
  • those who work in close contact with poultry, such as chickens.

Pregnant women & the Flu Vaccination

It is recommended that all pregnant women should have the flu vaccine, whatever stage of pregnancy they're in. This is because there is good evidence that pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu, particularly from the H1N1 strain.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine can be safely and effectively given during any trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not carry risks for either the mother or baby. In fact, studies have shown that mothers who have had the vaccine while pregnant pass some protection to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives.


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

Information about you and the care you receive is shared, in a secure system, by healthcare staff to support your treatment and care.

It is important that we, the NHS, can use this information to plan and improve services for all patients. We would like to link information from all the different places where you receive care, such as your GP, hospital and community service, to help us provide a full picture. This will allow us to compare the care you received in one area against the care you received in another, so we can see what has worked best.

Information such as your postcode and NHS number, but not your name, will be used to link your records in a secure system, so your identity is protected. Information which does not reveal your identity can then be used by others, such as researchers and those planning health services, to make sure we provide the best care possible for everyone.

You have a choice. If you are happy for your information to be used in this way you do not have to do anything. If you have any concerns or wish to prevent this from happening, please speak to practice staff or download a copy of the leaflet “How information about you helps us to provide better care”. below

We need to make sure that you know this is happening and the choices you have.

Care Data - Frequently Asked Questions

If Death Occurs At Home

1. Telephone the doctor who will visit to confirm that death has taken place.

2. Contact a funeral director.

3. Arrange to collect the doctor's Medical Certificate of Death (usually from the surgery).

4. Take this to the Registrars Office, (together with the deceased's Medical Card and Birth Certificate, if available) for the area in which the death took place. Alternatively you can register by declaration at any convenient Registrars Office but certificates will not be available as these will have to be posted to you a few days later.

5. The Registrar will normally issue a Green coloured certificate for you to give to your funeral director who will look after necessary arrangements for the funeral. The Registrar will also issue a white notification certificate for the DSS. They will also enquire as to the number of Certified Copies you require for dealing with the deceased finances (a fee is payable for each copy).

If The Death Occurs In Hospital

1. Contact a funeral director to inform him his services are required.

2. Collect the certificate from the hospital then follow 4 - 5 as above

Note For Cremation

Your funeral director will usually liaise directly with the surgery regarding the additional certification required.

Please click on the following link to view our Bereavement Support and Advice leaflet:

Bereavement Support and Advice

Patient Advice and Liaison Service (PALS)

The NHS employs over a million staff in thousands of locations. It is a large and complex organisation providing a broad range of services. It is not surprising that sometimes you or a loved one may feel bewildered or concerned when using the NHS. And this can be at times when you are feeling at your most vulnerable and anxious.

So, what should you do if you want on the spot help when using the health service? The NHS expects all members of staff to listen and respond to you to the best of their ability. But sometimes, you may wish to talk to someone employed especially to help you. The Patient Advice and Liaison Service, known as PALS, has been introduced to ensure that the NHS listens to patients, their relatives, carers and friends, and answers their questions and resolves their concerns as quickly as possible.

PALS also helps the NHS to improve services by listening to what matters to patients and their loved ones and making changes, when appropriate.

What does PALS do?

In particular, PALS will:

  • Provide you with information about the NHS and help you with any other health-related enquiry
  • Help resolve concerns or problems when you are using the NHS
  • Provide information about the NHS complaints procedure and how to get independent help if you decide you may want to make a complaint
  • Provide you with information and help introduce you to agencies and support groups outside the NHS
  • Inform you about how you can get more involved in your own healthcare and the NHS locally
  • Improve the NHS by listening to your concerns, suggestions and experiences and ensuring that people who design and manage services are aware of the issues you raise
  • Provide an early warning system for NHS Trusts and monitoring bodies by identifying problems or gaps in services and reporting them.Find out more

    If you would like more information about PALS, the functions it is intended to provide, and the standards it should strive to achieve, follow this link.

We would like to know how we can improve our service to you and how you perceive our surgery and staff.

To help us with this, we are setting up a virtual patient representation group so that you can have your say. We will ask the members of this representative group some questions from time to time, such as what you think about our opening times or the quality of the care or service you received. We will contact you via email and keep our surveys succinct so it shouldn’t take too much of your time.

We aim to gather around a hundred patients from as broad a spectrum as possible to get a truly representative sample. We need young people, workers, retirees, people with long term conditions and people from non-British ethnic groups.

You can download the sign up form as a pdf document, print it out, complete it and return it to the practice.

Download the pdf version of our sign up form

We will be in touch shortly after we receive your form. Please note that no medical information or questions will be responded to.

Many thanks for your assistance


The information you supply us will be used lawfully, in accordance with the Data Protection Act 1998. The Data Protection Act 1998 gives you the right to know what information is held about you and sets out rules to make sure that this information is handled properly.

There is a new Central NHS Computer System called the Summary Care Record (SCR). The Summary Care Record is meant to help emergency doctors and nurses help you when you contact them when the surgery is closed. Initially, it will contain just your medications and allergies.

Later on as the central NHS computer system develops, (known as the ‘Summary Care Record’ – SCR), other staff who work in the NHS will be able to access it along with information from hospitals, out of hours services, and specialists letters that may be added as well.

Your information will be extracted from practices such as ours and held on central NHS databases.

As with all new systems there are pros and cons to think about. When you speak to an emergency doctor you might overlook something that is important and if they have access to your medical record it might avoid mistakes or problems, although even then, you should be asked to give your consent each time a member of NHS Staff wishes to access your record, unless you are medically unable to do so.

On the other hand, you may have strong views about sharing your personal information and wish to keep your information at the level of this practice. Connecting for Health (CfH), the government agency responsible for the Summary Care Record have agreed with doctors’ leaders that new patients registering with this practice should be able to decide whether or not their information is uploaded to the Central NHS Computer System.

For existing patients it is different in that it is assumed that you want your record uploaded to the Central NHS Computer System unless you actively opt out.

For further information visit the Connecting for Health Website

If you choose to opt out of the scheme, then you will need to complete a form and bring it along to the surgery.

 

The Practice handles all complaints in line with NHS guidance. If you wish to make a complaint, please download and print the following leaflet, or pick up a copy from Reception.

Complaints leaflet